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ensure that the iranian government forsakes nuclear weapons. peace is far more preferable to war. the inevitable costs, the unintended consequences that would come with war means that we have to do everything we can to try to resolve this diplom diplomatical diplomatically. because of the cooperation between our governments, we know that there remains time to pursue a diplomatic resolution. that's what america will do with clear eye, working with a world that's united and with the sense of urgency that's required. but iran must know this time is not unlimited. and i've made the position the united states of america clear. iran must not get a nuclear weapon. this is not a danger that can be contained, and as president i've said all options are on the table for achieving our objectives. america will do what we must to prevent a nuclear-armed iran. [ applause ] for young israelis, i know that these issues of security are rooted in an experience that's even more fundamental than the pressing threat of the day. you live in a neighborhood where many of your neighbors have rejected the
are sort of the first step to the government coming into your house and trying to take away your guns. so that, i think, has been the, you know, the strength of their appeal. much more so than dollars and cents. they're part of the culture in parts of the country. >> we put that poll up, and we saw support for some level of gun control go up after newtown. now it seems to be slipping back a little bit more. i think karen has a great point, rana. it really is that slippery slope argument. >> it is. listen, i grew up in rural indiana. i understand parts of the country have different attitudes about guns. again, i think we've really gotten a twisted view of what the american norm is. if you go back to the 19th century or the earlier part of the 20th century, gun control laws were much stricter, even in free-wheeling -- or places perceived as being free wheeling like texas, colorado, western states. i think that our sense of normal has just moved so far away from what a middle point is that we need to get back there. >> rana, karen, thanks to both of you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> also
place, leading to huge securityish a us in egypt next door. egypt has a government. not entirely functioning government but it hasn't cancelled the historic peace treaty with israel. but security situation in egypt is collapsing all around it and that is the real fear, if they have total collapse. al qaeda elements increasingly large roles in the opposition. and a real issue of authority next door in syria, post assad. >> martin, let's talk about the other major issue here that is certainly on the agenda there. president perez said today after his meeting, that israel trusts the u.s. policy to prevept iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. not just to contain, but to prevent. do you foresee, martin, any change from the administration towards iran either in action or tone? >> i would imagine that the administration does not want any change for the time being. and i would just like to add to your introduction. i'm not sure it is true to say israel trust the united states completely. they need to say that they do and they need to believe the united states because they are still -- th
with the israeli government? >> you know, i think as much as anything, he's trying to slightly reset them with the general israeli public. one realizes that netanyahu knows what the deal is. they've met ten times? that's far more than he's met with putin, far more than the leaders with china and ironically more than some particular congressional leaders. but reputations and images, as you know, good and bad, are hard to lose. and here's a situation in which the image among both conservatives in this country and among the israeli public fly in the face of what are the facts. never in history on many levels, intelligence sharing, military aid, security information being shared has a relationship been any stronger than it is today and a little bit of news if you're listening to that press conference was that this significant military aid package that we have with israel that we give israel, looks like it's going to be extended by another ten years as of the year 2017. now, that doesn't sound like mortal enemies at work. and when you look at what played out today and it wasn't just the joking
the threat of a government shutdown next week. not shutting down the whole federal government used to be the kind of thing you could reasonably expect from your congress, the kind of thing they get done as a matter of course. under house speaker john boehner, not shutting down the government has become a notable achievement for this congress. mozle top on that. a low bar. >>> house republicans also voted today again for the paul ryan budget. democrats are very excited about that because they plan to use that vote against republicans in campaign ads for the next election. we have the one and only ezra klein here momentarily to sort out what's important about what they just voted on in congress and whether we just avoided one of the cliff slash ceilings clash crisis congress now schedules for us every few weeks and whether the way they avoided this next one is itself important. there's a lot going on in the news. we have a lot ahead. we begin tonight with late breaking and rather surprising news from the democratic leader in the senate, senator harry reid. following two days of angry
government can come in and take your guns away. that's what the debate will be. >> governor dean, as someone that had a strong rating from the nra, i want to point to some of the reaction comes from senators who are probably going to have a hard time on the vote on this bill. mark pryor says in a statement, with i don't take gun advice from the mayor of new york city. i listen to arkansans. there's a little bit more room in the statement from senator mary landrieu. senator landrieu has a great deal of respect for mayor bloomberg on a great deal issues, but the senator will be listening closely to her constituents on this issue. you hear that and look at the poll, it is overwhelmingly supported by 91% of this country. some form of universal background check. why then is it so hard for our political class to catch up with that, governor? >> this is about guns and power -- excuse me, this is about money and power. this is not about guns. what the nra is doing, you played the clip. look, i ran for office eight times, statewide in vermont. i got an "a" from the nra every single time. why? because
, to the prestige and credibility of the u.s. government are daunting and dismaying if we found the wmd it would have been different. it totally would have been different but we didn't. >> sure. right. >> so are the american people more likely to question the challenge of this country being capable and on a proper premise to go into war? >> absolutely. i mean, those poll numbers that you cited way back when, ten years ago, were reflective of what the american people were told by its government, by its president, its secretary of state, its secretary of defense. the case was made for going to war with iraq. you know, in a time of war the american people rally around the president. but as more information came out, as more facts and corrections of the record came out, the american people saw that they were in essence lied to about getting into a war, not one of necessity but one of choice. and so i think going forward, particularly with the saber rattling with iran and what's being talked about with north korea and its belligerence, the american people are going to be very cautious. i should say m
and grows the government even bigger. and i agree with the "washington post" -- that said that the democrat budget is not a viable plan. it's not a responsible account of the really the magnitude of the mess that we're in financially and what we need to be facing. so i think it's one of the reasons that you do see 400 amendments. the big amendments that came out and voted for last night was the one to repeal part of the health care law. the part that deals with the specific tax on medical devices. 79 members of the senate voted in favor of it. including 34 democrats. and none of them were breaking ranks before the president was re-elected. now you're hearing more and more complaints about the health care law. >> senator, i want to ask you, you use the phrase, the senate budget not being a viable plan. >> that was the "washington post's" assessment of it. >> the same criticism has been labeled to the paul ryan budget, which uses as part of its calculation, defunding broadly, president obama's health care law. which i think, i think we probably can agree, is not likely to happen. if both side
how government raises and spends money. >> wow. >> just 19% support the way congressional republicans are dealing with it. and it was nearly split. 47% sided with the president, 46% sided with republicans, and i wonder, joe, if this is at least inspiration enough for them to just get a deal. is anyone going to get worse than this? really? why can't they at least get something done. >>> i think politically the pressure is more on the president for this reason. you go -- you ask somebody -- it's kind of like lawyers. i found that everybody hated lawyers, right? >> yep. everybody loves their own lawyer. you should have seen what she did in court. man, let me give you my lawyer's number. it's the same thing with congressmen. everybody hates congressmen, but hey, my guy, my woman, they go up there and boy they fight. so, again, you've got to put yourself in the position of a congressman looking at 31% approval rating going, yeah, that's fine. i'm saying that 74%, the words of dire straits, you know, i got a daytime job, i'm doing all right. i think the pressure when you look at these numbe
of the party right now is that it is anti-tax and once big cuts in the size of government. and that has not changed. and through the whole budget wars we've been seeing, the sequester, i think this came up the last time i was here. the economic conservatives, the low tax, small government conservatives have established their supremacy. they have beaten out the national security hawks who didn't want to see cuts to defense. i think this is an example where they're beating the social conservatives who aren't ready for a shift in gay marriage. opposition within the party to gay marriage is substantial and they don't want a more liberalized immigration policy. so the one thing that is still here is low taxes, including on the wealthy, and deep cuts to government. i think that is a fundamental problem for the party. it cause them problems with all kinds of groups. there is only so much you can do when you change the language as long as you hold on to the tax and spending cuts policies. >> you touched on immigration policy. i think lawmakers in washington on the republican side see it as esse
. >>> will the federal government begin stealing our money? yes! this late it's economic theory not of taxation, but outright theft was being discussed, but the cypriot government tried to introduce a new tax. though it was soundly rejected by the parliament, this didn't stop one particular television network from implying it might someday be proposed here in the united states. this nonsensical nothing was then followed by the asking of a question that appeared to come out of the nowhere. >> a research in killing jesus, do you know why jesus was killed? by the romans? >> that question has been considered by some of the finest theological minds in history. and it will be expounded from pull pits around the nation as we approach easter sunday. but all of them have clearly missed the point, according to mr. o'reilly. >> you don't know and shouldn't know, because it was about taxes. >> you don't know and you shouldn't know, because it was about taxes. now, as anyone with a modicum of biblical history will tell you, the death of christ was an act of substitutionary atonement. he neither lived nor di
the attitudes of -- >> you know what, the preachers, the rabbis, the government, the people who care about abortion rights, they got out of the pulpit this weekend and started issuing statements, try to avoid unprotected sex. you know what i mean? anyway, michael steele, stephanie, thank you. >>> up next, the return of sarah palin means one thing, the return of tina fey and her fantastic impression. >> i address you as governor, you served only half a term so what's the right term to address? >> well, i tell ya, i don't know. i'm a half governor or you could call me a maverick at large. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reactio
by himself. he must have gotten government-backed school loans, former public assistance and let's not derail the good i built it without help story. carson say brilliant medical thinker, but he has intellectual tumors in his mind like a flat tax which is regressive and ignorant wealth inexquality where the bottom 60% own 2.3%. i doubt jesus would tax them equally just as i doubt the gop would entertain a none-white politician with unserious ideas, but carson is enjoying the gop's version of affirmative action where black faces that can spit conservative game get raced to the front of the line because then people get to put a bumper sticker on their cars saying how can i be racist? i would have voted for cars be on which would fit nicely over the bumper sticker that said how can i be racist? i would have voted for cain. no matter how far from the political system they emerge from and no matter how unserious their ideas are because it's all make believe. none of them will ever get a nomination for the presidency just as the gop will never get black votes because the only thing they care about
is not showing up. romney went to the napc convention. the problem is which way we're going to govern and when they are saying tax cuts for the wealthy, cut everything that middle class and poor people need, let's protect private business but big government and government, period, needs to be reduced, the direction of the country is ultimately where voters are smart enough to see which way they want to he sue the country go. >> i think melissa is right. we always underestimate the importance of policy and underestimate everything else, whether charisma is the way somebody parts their hair and the republicans have lost ground among minority, among latinos, african-americans, among working class whites. five million working class whites did not vote in the last election because they were turned off by the mitt romney 47% and the republicans have sort of displayed an attitude towards government that was reflected in that and in the idea that people who may need government help at some point in their lives are moochers or takers. people hear that stuff and say, we can't vote for them. they haven't
pressure being exerted by the u.s. on the iraqi government to halt that type of aid, just as the supporters of the opposition, including saudi arabia, turkey and qatar are reportedly sending more weapons and money to the rebels. chris? >> ayman, thank you. more than 70,000 dead since the start of the conflict. remarkable. thanks for your reporting. >>> and for more on the secretary's middle east trip, i'm joined by nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell, traveling with secretary kerry and was able to give us this report by phone from afghanistan. >> reporter: chris, this is secretary kerry's sixth trip to afghanistan in the last couple years. but his first as secretary. and he's got a good relationship with hamid karzai, the very eccentric president of afghanistan. and this is a mission here. the question is, is he going to play good cop or bad cop today. given the fact that karzai was so difficult the last time he visited with a top american, which was chuck hagel, of course, defense secretary. kerry has such a good relationship, he's going to try to smooth things over.
living in a prison-like state governed at every step of their life by the east german government. >> tom did not have a prompter. tom did not have a script. he just had the entire history of the 20th century in his head. and it all came out that night. >> sometime after midnight at the berlin wall one of our computer technicians ed lee came running up wide-eyed and he handed me a big chunk of the berlin wall. and he said they were taking it down right before our eyes. so i keep a small kind of iconic piece of it on my desk constantly. i think it represents the shattering of the divisions between people and the collapse of the soviet union and communism as a political philosophy. you can build a wall, but the people will take it down. ♪ new day for the catholic church, and new questions about the church's influence on american politics. we have perspective this morning on the journey ahead for pope francis, from cardinal francis george, the archbishop of chicago. what message did the cardinals mean to send with the selection of the first ever pope from latin america? a special discussio
career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's no break through. i think it is a big deal that john boehner and others can't uphold this that the debt crisis is coming now or soon. if you go through what he said further, he said it is looming and coming. this is always the thing, with this spring of deficit hawk, there's always in some future the great crisis we need to fear. those that have said have been wrong, two years ago was supposed to be then. at least they're backing off it being so soon. that's eroding the underlying nature of the argument. >> does this help explain why they're doing nothing, the debt isn't a big deal? >> they a sequester, what more do they need. >
on in iraq now is the shia plurality, dominating a government and trying to dominate the kurds and the sunnis. i think it is more a continuing ethnic struggle where iraq's neighbors wish them no good. the iranians supporting the shia, the sunni arabs supporting anb anbar provinces. >> the "washington post" describeding him as neither the failed state, nor the model democracy some had wanted. what is the state of the government right now from your perspective there? >> reporter: well, there is a few different tests. on one hand, it is a country that hasn't completely grappled with democracy. it hasn't struggled in materials of creating more political freedom but there is no doubt democracy has not taken route across the country. the central government still struggles in the northern part of the country under kurdish control. it is a loose amalf. the government is rife with political corruption. there is indeed as we just heard, sectarian tension among political parties. still a lot of missing people in iraq. so by some estimates, although there is more political freedom and freedom of expressi
be a mushroom cloud. and that's not true. there was relationship between the iraqi government and the people who attacked us on 9/11. and yet, there's the republican presidential nominee, the last one to run, saying actually the iraq war was a war of liberation. at the republican convention this year, when they picked that nominee, the speech was given by the national security adviser during the iraq war, the one who said the smoking gun would be a mushroom cloud, who described that war in her speech that night at the convention as a hard hard decision to keep us from being attacked again. ten years later it is hard to come to terms with the fact we went to war based on something the president told us that was not true. there is nothing that can bring back the more than 4400 american troops who died in that war, the more than 30,000 american troops wounded will not be made whole. we cannot bring them back. we cannot heal their injuries retroactively. and george bush and dick cheney and condoleezza rice are still around. in terms of how we get right with this as a country, the accountability can'
with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that environment, those voices could be muffled and people were being painted as being anti-american because they were pro peace. >> right. mrs. walsh, we saw what donald rumsfeld said on twitter. we saw dick cheney say he would do it all over again and not acknowledge any mistakes. >> the main fault -- i don't spend a lot of time thinking about my faults i guess would be the answer. >> no kind of political introspection there. but will history let these men off the hook for what they did? >> no, they're going down in history for a horrible, terrible war. i was going to say a lapse of judgment, but it was not a lapse of judgment. it was a deliberate act. they cooked the evidence. they brow beat people. they would karl rove as their political hench men. the vote was scheduled on the eve of the elections deliberately. i don't want to let democrats off the hook. 29 senate democrats voted to authorize the use of force. some apolo
of a governing authority. that could all be done by any pope. >> the center of gravity changing, look at the mere fact of a pope from the americas and how many catholics are from latin america, some 40% of over a billion catholics in the world, anna, are latinos. and this is such a significant moment. when the church changes. >> huge, david. really, i can't talk about what it means for hispanics. there's a lot of rivalries between latin american countries. i can tell you we are all so thrilled at having a latin pope, we don't even mind he's argentinian. just wonderful to have a pope that is going to be able to relate to the americas that lived in political strife, that lived under the repression, that has seen what is going on in argentina, the poverty, the economic crisis, that can not only speak our language but can get our ladnguage, is one of us. i think you'll see him active on issues like immigration. you're going to see that the archbishops will be more active in that even though they have been active already. and like chris, i do hope to see more participation by women in the church. i wo
this is a historic visit for president obama. >> now's the time for the iranian government to take immediate and meaningful steps to reduce tensions. >> taxing more, borrowing more, and spending more is not a path to prosperity. >> republican budget is same baby with a new diaper. >> the republicans are just totally bamboozled. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis. >> we do have an immediate problem. >> they think they got landslided and they didn't. >> more than half of our members have never dealt with the issue of immigration reform. >>> we start today with all eyes on one of the most volatile regions of the world. as the president prepares to fly to israel just a few short hours from now. and while the president and prime minister netanyahu already have a congested agenda, ranging from the arab spring, to the israeli/palestinian conflict, there was yet another disturbing development today in syria when both the rebels and forces loyal to president assad accused each other of firing chemical weapons that syrian state tv has said killed at least 25 people in the north of the country.
to the fore what is conservatism, right? i mean there's a lot of argument about the government needs to stay out of my back yard and the party in terms of its national policies has embraced specifically those policies that are intrusive. whether that's a transvaginal ultrasound or deciding who gets to get married or who doesn't. sam you've written about the trajectory of the republican party are, we witnessing a moment where you may in fact as matt lewis says, conservatives have already lost the culture war. sure, some politicians with stapd on principle, but eventually politicians represent public opinion, then he maligns social conservative groups saying the so-called pro family groups are most lay joke. could this be beginning of the end for social conservatives sitting inside the republican party tent? >> it could be and what's so tough for them to deal with. i think everybody here knows, for 20 years, when republicans dominated politics, from 1968 to 1988, they don't realize that's when it ended. it was social issues that got them there. i've had two names for you. barry goldwater, who
not going to happen. >> talk about big government. >> we have to look at -- can you imagine having the ships and planes hauling off people. i agree that, you know, right now if you really look to the future, we need to have these new workers. we need them for hi-tech jobs but we need them for agricultural jobs. >> your district is a place that, you know, there's been an interesting story about, about the way immigration has worked on long island and it's changed long island in a lot of ways. places have gotten far, far more diverse quite quickly. i remember when i covered the last big immigration fight in 2006-2007, one of the hot spots was in long island partly because things had changed very quickly. there were a lot of day laborers. tensions around day laborers. what are the politics four and your district? >> the politics for me to be very honest with you and i think i have extremely intelligent constituents -- >> as does every member of congress. >> they follow what's going on as far as in the news and everything else like that. but my district, the immigration issue is so diverse. it's
-- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one that interprets what the constitution actually means and says, has said clearly that reasonable background checks are consistent with the second amendment. that's what in the end is going to stop all of these other suits. if the laws that they are trying to contest are consistent with that, they won't g
. there is no precedent for something off that ticket and thrust into governing responsibility. the balance he has to strike is doing his demanding day job and maintaining his options in the event he wants to run for president and a difficult balance to strike. >> you know him well. do you sense he aspires to more nationally? did he get a taste for president politics the last time around? >> i don't want to speak for him but i think he continues to have a taste and ambition to have a big impact on some of these issues he cares about nationally. he's a number of ways he can do it punish. mark leibovich wrote that article. paul ryan can't lose. meaning he could run for president if he stays in congress, he'll be chairman of ways and means committee and some talk about him playing a more prominent role in leadership so he has to decide where he can make his mark. no one i believe has done more to advance the conservative policy agenda in terms of where he has moved through republican congress the last for a years. >> mark, he's a young man, in his early 40s. he has a lot of politics ahead of him. wha
the libertarians who just want government out of their face and out of their lives and you kell another engine. try to do what reince priebus is doing right now and you will see the problem, try steering the car with your engine dead. try steering the political party once you kill the motor. you set out to kill the big motors of the republican party itself. for progressives the amazing thing here is people on the left, center left, and a big share of the center right now are together. they know why the republican established wants to free itself from the issues, they are relieved, thrilled really, it not them trying to hold together a motley crew. senior strategist for rick santorum's political campaign. let me go -- i want to start with the basic question of a political party. this week's republican autopsy report it's being called urged the party to be more inclusive of gay people, women, minorities, did not go unnoticed by the social conservative wing of the party. the report makes little of their concerns. the report never mentions the word christian or church. there's know -- no talk of abort
on the show a little later. and let's turn back to the politics here at home where the government is likely to stay open, at least for now, in a broad bipartisan vote the senate passed a spending bill 73-26 on wednesday to keep the government funded through the end of the fiscal year. but the next fiscal fights are already under way this morning. after a day of pageantry and political theater on the house floor, the house will vote on congressman paul ryan's 2014 budget. >> as a member of the budget committee opposed to the job-killing pathway to poverty ryan budget, i stand in strong support of the progressive caucus's back to work budget. >> the ryan republican budget is a job killer. in ten years there will be no medicare guarantee. >> here's the theme. take more money from the economy, take more money from families, take more money from small businesses, spend it in washington and hope everything works out. >> it is a vision that will not be implemented and he knows it. >> taxes just went up by $1.6 trillion. what do they want to do? throw another trillion on top. guess what, they may s
, to you know recognize that palestinians deserve a state, that they have just as much right to self-governance as the israelis do. and that you know, i've been using this construct, there's security to peace, which is one way to look at it but there's also peace to security. i think that was the argument he was trying to make yesterday. >> the justice peace of it was also really pronounced heather and we've talked about the president's second inaugural. and the fact that he's laid out a vision for this country that some people have said it's decidedly progressive. but at its core is about peace and justice. >> he linked the struggle in the middle east to peace and the civil rights movement and the long march for justice. that humanizes everyone. he talked about the joshua generation, an underrecognized theme in his 2008 campaign and the idea there is it was actually the next generation, the joshua generation that pulled the people out of, out of the wilderness and into the promised land. and a lot of people have talked about how our generation, the sort of post civil rights generation is going
assertions by the highest officials in the government. without looking for the hard evidence to support it. >> more concern about the politics of my decision rather than what is right and what is wrong. >> i have prayed to god many times that he would forgive me for sending his children to die in a war that never had to happen. >> was there ever any consideration of apologizing to the american people? >> i mean, apologizing would basically say the decision was a wrong decision. and i don't believe it was a wrong decision. >>> one last stop. the president this morning heading home from the mideast. today, what he said on one particular issue is making big headlines. >>> signs of the sequester. it could be coming to an airport near you. might it lead to dangerous skies? >>> up all night. they call it. the u.s. senate just finished its business a short time ago. why did they stay so late? >>> it's a bird, it's a plane, it's actually neither. but it is something that caught the eye of thousands. good morning, everyone and welcome to "weekends with alex witt." let's get to what's happening righ
. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting deficit under control, if you look at the budget control act, if you look at the tax increases from the
. overseas, a the love federal government, legal questions. she was fbled by republicans for two and a half years. the president spoke out on that amidst all the other busy stuff he was doing on foreign policy this week. and he said even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continued to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination. the d.c. circuit has more vacancies than any other appeals court. yet we know this doesn't get a lot of attention. do you think there is any. >> to put more pressure on this do nothing congress? >> it is unlikely she will come back up. what is happening here is that this is part of the conservative cause on judicial nominations. they're made about what happened during the bush years when democrats blocked a landful of very conservative judicial nominees. in some respects, this might be payback. what could obama do? he can try another couple of judicial nominations. the bottom line is he needs to clear these judicial nominations with at least a handful of republicans. otherwise if they're too liberal, they will get filibustered. >> thank y
the relationship with israel, with its government in particular so that john kerry can come in and with new ideas and be received, better than some of obama's first-term ideas were received. so there is a point to this trip, but it's a building block trip. >>> jeff goldberg, thank you very much, as always. >> thank you. >>> and up next, in our "daily fix" who killed the senate assault weapons ban. >>> plus mark sanford survives round 1 in south carolina, and why is bill clinton getting involved in the kentucky democratic senate race against ashley judd? send me your thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is "andrea mitchell reports" live in israel, only on msnbc. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ ♪ i don't wanna be right [ record scratch ] what?! it's not bad for you. it just tastes t
are in a good spot. >> the government is likely to stay open. >> the revenue discussion is over. >> at least for now. >> how could you describe the current state of the gop? >> you're asking me a question i can't answer. >> this is a party in turmoil. >> it's not about the messaging. it's the message. >> get ready, america, for a brand new republican party. >> we have a party that's goodbye to be inclusive. >> sign up today and get a free bag of weed. >>> the most memorable and most important day in the history of american presidential trips to israel was today. president richard nixon was the first president to go to israel. he may have done to simply to distract public attention from the investigation that was corroding his presidency and eventually led to his resignation, because we have had precious few presidents more cynical than richard nixon. the next president, gerald ford, did not go to israel. president jimmy carter visited israel, but ronald reagan never thought israel was worth the trip. nor did his successor, president george h.w. bush. then president bill clinton made up for t
it was with the potential for a government shutdown, which has now been averted. so again, back to this new pace rhine of these big debates over real issues that are kind of going nowhere. and a new baseline that incidentally it's interesting because their stopgap spending bill that was passed yesterday did mark something of a breakthrough in that the appropriators in the house and the senate, the bipartisan leaderships thereof were able to come together and come up with a spending plan that keeps the government solvent and keeps it operating. and so i think that now we are going to see the appropriators get, you know, being able to get together hopefully and work out these, you know, technocratic stopgap spending bills while the battle wages in the background without any hope of actual consensus. >> good to see both of you. have a good weekend. we are hearing this morning from the commander of the marine base in kwaunt coe, virginia where three were killed. ask as we take care of our marines and their families that are dealing with this tragedy, i'd also ask for the support of our neighbors, the comm
oppressive and demonizing to african-americans and women that the federal government should supersede that. >> so nancy, what states and voters can do, voters have turned back amendments every time they have an opportunity to. >> well, sure. they have. but we have to think about in north dakota the six-week ban is not put to the voters. that's something the north dakota legislature put there and is on the the desk. and this is what the supreme court said looking at the issue. these decisions about your most personal life, these decisions about treated dignity in making, this is not for the same of north dakota or mississippi to vote away. i mean, the court said it is the promise of our constitutional that there's an area of life that the government may not enter. and decision about women's body and held and the numbers facing children are part of the decision. sfl and this always feels shocking to me when i hear it from republicans. you want the state out. so why do you suddenly want it in? wii going to stay on this top iblg when we get back. after the break we'll add a couple more voices
oversight right. federal courts starting to that. >> because of bad policy, the federal government is looking at this. this is a policy that has gone wild. that has -- >> why has it gone wild? >> it is all a numbers game. >> i know it is a numbers game. what i have seen in the trajectory of this is this was happening -- it says something about the way the power works in the city. this was happening in -- every 15-year-old black kid in the bronx and in brooklyn and queens. and in harlem. >> creating so much outrage. >> yes. but why has it taken so long for that outrage to manifest itself? >> as stop and frisks have gone up and up and up in recent years, the outrage is bubbling over to the point where now it is just unacceptable. amount of division that has created between police and community members has gotten to the point i believes the making it less safe for everybody. meanwhile, it is distracting resource. >> in 2009. it wasn't as if it wasn't spoken about and hasn't been spoken about. >> ran in 2009. >> what's occurred over a period of time is the numbers continue to escalate.
government. and is somewhat weakened after a tough re-election fight. so from the white house perspective, he comes, the president comes here at a pretty good time to try to reach out to the israeli people. try to let them believe that he really does care about israel. that he has their back. they've been very much supported by the united states militarily. the iron dome missile defense system. but for some reason israeli people, perhaps because of the president's 2009 speech in cairo. there is a feeling in israel that he has not shown them the love. so he's going to try to do that on this trip. he's going to go to the historic founder of israel, the hertzel monument. to show that he doesn't believe that israel's roots began only after the holocaust. and that he agrees with israel's timeline that it goes back to millennium. he's going to see the dead sea skrols. he'll pay homage to israel's deep rots and go to the west bank, go to ramallah and speak with the leader of the palestinians, try to get more of a warmer relationship. then they're talking about iran. and iran is front and center. he
consultations, building on what we have already discussed. as bb just formed a new government, as i am entering my second term, that, you know, we continue to have close consultation around some of these shares of interest that we have discussed. iran being obviously a prominent shared concern. i want to make sure that the israeli people and israeli government consistently understand my thinking and how i'm approaching this problem and i want to understand how the israeli government and the prime minister is approaching this problem, to make sure that there are no misunderstandings there. with respect to the peace process, as i said, i'll have more to say about this tomorrow. but i think you were absolutely right, that over the last year, year and half, two years, two and half years, we haven't gone forward. we haven't seen the kind of progress we would like to see. the fact of the matter is, even with all that's happening in the region, the palestinian authority has worked effectively in cooperation with the international community in part because of some of the training that we, the united st
the federal government's attitude. the states would still decide for themselves but the federal government would have to recognize the marriages in those states. now numbering 9 that permit same sex marriage and if doma is upheld, then federal government goes on ignoring those marriages, depriving same sex couples of about 1,000 federal benefits. >> thank you very much. i know we'll be to you daily and we'll see what happens next. and let me bring in liz mayer who is on the advisory county. steve, chairman of the gay and lesbian victory fund, and the constitutional law professor at georgetown university. thank you for joining me. paul, i would like to start with you. "time" magazine had the cover, from gay marriage to obama care, justice anthony kennedy is the decider. i want to show this to you. and read a portion of talking points memorandum officially there was an article posted. it said there have been two decisions in american history expanding rights for gays and lesbians. anthony kennedy wrote the opinion for both. he know where history is going and that he faces the choice between
, these kids lose a parent in the war, they can have help from the u.s. government to go to college. only now, those grants are being cut. by more than a third. here you go, kid. sorry about your mom, your dad, go study up on the sequester. last week, the army announced it was suspended new grants for tuition assistance for soldiers themselves. again, the sequester. and a situation where troops returning from war are forced to wait in a very, very, very long line for the benefits we oweded them. the benefits we promised them and for which they are eligible. nearly 900,000 veterans waiting right now just to hear back from the veterans administration. the average wait to hear back now is nine months. it's even longer if you have just come back from iraq or aufg. with so many veterans now able to come home, we have not done what we need to do in order to accommodate them, so the wait times are getting longer and not shorts. wait times and kuos to college grants, they're not a scam like the thing rick scott's lieutenant governor was tied up in. there's no one profiting from this national embarras
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